Fate/Zero Route 0 – Where it all Began…

What I Wanted from Fate

When I previously watched and reviewed Fate/Stay Night (2006), I made no secret of the fact that I enjoyed it but found the series to have multiple issues. I had guessed that watching something like Fate/Zero would have made going backwards a lot harder for myself, and I suspect newer fans would be of no exception. Now that I’ve watched Fate/Zero, I can safely say that the order I chose to view these titles in was indeed the correct one as this was easily the better of the two experiences. To put things simply, Fate/Zero was everything I wanted out of the Fate franchise the first time around, a polished version of what was first attempted in 2006. Continue reading “Fate/Zero Route 0 – Where it all Began…”

The Song of Saya – A Continued Look at Gen Urobuchi’s Earlier Work

A Disgustingly Beautiful Visual Novel

In the world of anime Gen Urobuchi is someone who needs no introduction. You might recognize him for such titles as Madoka Magica and Psycho-Pass, but his career actually goes a lot deeper than this. Last year I spent a ton of time researching and familiarizing myself with his creations for a review of Phantom: Requiem for a Phantom (which I recommend you give a look as I don’t want to retread that same information here), upon doing so, I was reminded of today’s focal point:  The Song of Saya. Continue reading “The Song of Saya – A Continued Look at Gen Urobuchi’s Earlier Work”

Phantom: Requiem for the Phantom – A Near Perfect Adaptation

The Best Bee Train Show I’ve Seen

Maybe you haven’t heard of Bee Train as a studio, but they have less than a stellar reputation. You probably have heard of Gen Urobuchi, known for such series as Psycho-Pass and Madoka Magica. So what happens when these two get together to adapt one of Urobuchi’s early visual novels? Well, you get Phantom: Requiem for the Phantom, a dramatic tale of two assassins filled to the brim with twists and turns. Continue reading “Phantom: Requiem for the Phantom – A Near Perfect Adaptation”