Alien: Covenant: A Tale of Two Tales (An Average Conclusion)

Long is the way and hard, that out of hell leads up to light

John Milton, Paradise Lost

As the level of anticipation for this last Alien entry has risen to be nearly palpable, so too rises the level of disappointment of the movies overall. Looking back over the series, you can track the quality of the movies and almost create a roller coaster ride with the line connecting them. The thunderous beginning of the series, followed by twists and turns and corkscrews in the movies that come after. All of these aspects inevitably ending with this movie: a slow and sad end of the ride. Ending a series with a movie like this reminds us all of lessons taught repeatedly throughout many franchises in the last decade: a simple premise  CANNOT uphold 40 years of movies and still remain as fresh as the start. I’m pretty bad at analogies involving roller coasters, but I’m pretty good at being bitter and jaded about movies, so let’s end this project with Alien: Covenant.

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‘It Comes At Night’ Film Review

Grade: C-

I have never been more baffled at a movie-going experience than ‘It Comes at Night’; not that I hated the movie or anything, but as I was sitting in a near empty theater with my best friend, I was feeling a little discomfort while sitting through this independent horror film written and directed by Trey Edward Schults; it isn’t the discomfort you usually get by watching a horror film (despite the film’s creepiest, most unsettling moments happening at night, or in nightmare sequences), this feeling was a range of emotions from boredom, to frustration, to even confusion. I noticed it from my friend, who was sitting next to me, and the vibe made me more unsettled than this film tried to.

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‘Selma’ Film Review

Grade: A

Selma Movie Poster

Martin Luther King Jr. day is coming, so it only seemed right for the Pix Theater to show Ava DuVernay’s biopic of the amazing preacher/civil rights leader/public speaker, Martin Luther King Jr. Although it doesn’t show his life from birth (which thank God, it doesn’t), it still manages to capture a time in his life when racism was still relevant and people of color didn’t fully get the rights they needed, which lead Martin to fight for equal rights by marching from Selma to Montgomery with tons of people who joined in, making history with each step. They can vote now, but are still faced with prejudice and hate crimes, including violence. That alone makes ‘Selma’ relevant to today’s world of cinema. It came out in late 2014 (just in time for the 2015 Oscars), but its relevancy and social commentary still hold up today when crime and racial issues are heavily on the rise.

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